THE RULES: Click on the link for one or more of the stories. Read the story. Post a comment about the story, using the questions provided as a guideline. Respond to other comments about the story. Enjoy yourself.

Comments are moderated, so there might be a short delay before they appear. Please keep the language clean and the comments friendly.


DON'T BE SHY ABOUT LEAVING COMMENTS ON THE STORIES!!!!!! THE MORE COMMENTS--THE MORE FUN IT IS FOR EVERYONE!!!

Thursday, June 30, 2011

The Man of No Account

THE MAN OF NO ACCOUNT, by Bret Harte

A brief character study by Western writer Bret Harte.

1) Is David Fagg a "man of no account?" Or does he have qualities the narrator does not recognize?

2 comments:

Bill said...

Interesting story!

Is David Fagg a "man of no account?" Or does he have qualities the narrator does not recognize?

To start, what does it mean to be a 'man of no-account?' The clinical definition would suggest that he was literally without worth. (i.e. he has nothing in his bank account) But in usage it is often refers to someone who doesn't or won't ever amount to anything.

But that Fagg was rather pleased to be referred to as a 'no-account' is to me actually the most interesting part of the story... I would put forth that there is a 2nd usage of the phrase 'no-account' A potential phrase might be 'to take no-account of that man over there.' suggesting that 'take no account' and 'take no notice' were roughly similar as well.

This 2nd usage fits Fagg perfectly. He is perfectly willing to not draw attention to himself. His meekness is his primary attribute. But to finally answer the question, I am pretty sure that the narrator sees the all the underlying qualities of Fagg that we do... He simply does not value them! In fact going further, I don't think Fagg valued himself that much either.

Now a question back at you... Where do you think 'the author' stands on the subject of the qualities of Fagg?

Tim DeForest said...

Oh, I think the author though David was a good man who stood out from the others in terms of his quiet generosity and decency. But Harte was portraying a society where these qualities were simply not recognized as worthwhile.